Sunday, June 05, 2016

peonies, success and Sunday

As Ed pounds another stake into the ground to create a second trellis for now our second row of grapes, he pauses, looks over his shoulder at the acre of prairie grasses and waist-high weeds and says -- someday that will be all buckwheat. Bees will come and the groundhog will have his share...


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(He's referring to our experiment this year with sowing buckwheat. Here he is, studying the land to see if there are any sprouts yet...)


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And, too, he's talking about the groundhog family that lives in our wood pile. They recently had a few babies and today we spotted a brave little soul venturing out into the field.)


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To some people, success means a large house, a nice car and maybe a place by the beach for a winter getaway. To Ed, none of that matters. I truly believe that if we succeeded in planting the fallow land with blooming buckwheat, he would ask no more of life.


(The grapes are looking so good right now! We planted six new vines today and honestly, it is one of the prettiest things you can put into your garden. So much so that I wonder why more people don't grow grapes.)


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The day begins with an imposing cloud cover.


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I thought that perhaps I should catch a few flower photos early on. Might it rain today? (That would be wishful thinking: young plantings need water. It's rain, or stand over tomatoes with a hose.)

So what's catching my eye in the garden? Well, the annuals in the pots are the big spark of color by the path to the farmhouse.


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But honestly, we're still riding the wave of peonies. Theirs is a mighty show that carries us through the early days of June.

(Peonies, inside and out).


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Once they're done, the garden rests (with a few exceptions). The next big show isn't until the end of June when the day lilies begin to take charge. But for now, I am just in awe of all that peonies bring to the farmette.


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Okay okay okay! There are other blooming plants that deserve my attention.


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(Ah, the ever adorable Java, trampling over my flowers. Let it not be said that I am not tolerant!)


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Yet, a peony is so extravagant, so full of color, that you can't help but notice her whenever she is in the mix.


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Breakfast (yes, with peonies)...


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(We always have company for our morning meal. Do you see Butter? The cheepers hover just outside the screen, typically doing their morning cleaning under the sweeping branches of --you guessed it, peonies.)


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A wonderfully protracted meal. We could sit like this for a long while, but we do have the grapes to plant (see notes above).

(It's a day for all gardeners and farmers to put in solid hours of work. These guys work the fields just to the north of us.)


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(It's also a terrific day to sit on the porch and sip a macchiato. I do both: work then sip.)


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And here's an important reminder: it's Sunday. The young family comes to the farmhouse for dinner. On the porch. With peonies!


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Snowdrop is joyous and eager to play/read/eat/walk -- in other words, do it all!


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Supper is spaghetti primavera -- a great dish to serve in June, when all spring vegetables are there for you to cook up and throw into the pasta. Snowdrop approves.


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The evening on the porch is lovely...


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... but of course, the little girl wants to be out. And free.


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Her parents walk the land with her. She leads them to all corners of the farmette...


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She remembers which flowers are okay to pick... (thank you, Snowdrop!)




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Day is done. Time for Snowdrop to go home.


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See you tomorrow, little one. Sweet dreams, of chickens and flowers and silly things!


3 comments:

  1. I tried bringing peonies in from the garden once or twice, but they are so filled with ants that I stopped cutting them... don't yours bring ants into the house, too? Ours are just filled with them... so I leave them growing on the plants... they ARE gorgeous!

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  2. Peony story: Our youngest child had shoulder-length curls by the age of 18 months -- he wandered into the peony to sniff its overwhelming perfume -- and it was full of not only ants but WASPS! One got tangled in his long curls and stung his neck. His 6-year-old brother reacted faster than I did. He leapt into the peony and pulled Jon out. I have NEVER forgotten that moment. Mike, our young hero! And that, it seems, is Mike. Very observant and quick to know what to do.

    I pulled the damn peony out! I did! But I still did not cut Jon's curls until summer really got hot.

    Of course it wasn't the poor peony's fault but I didn't want to look at it. and never will have one again. unforgiving, eh?

    Such a lovely family day for you. I wish we all could have Sunday dinner together. Well, we do - but only once a month.
    Snowdrop - radiant in yet another pretty dress!


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  3. Favorite photos are the lush peonies and basically any of the ones showing Snowdrop exploring and showing her parents around the property.

    ReplyDelete

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